Reviewed by Matt Ritchey

We’ve all thought it (and some of us are still thinking it) – “when am I finally going to meet the right person?” Is the “right person” a myth? And how do I get out of my own way long enough to have a real conversation with someone new?

Stephen Fife explores these all-too-relatable questions in a series of short meditations on Feeling Lucky. Eddie Navarro pitches the crowd a hell of a suggestion: Let’s just get rid of Saturday nights! Akin to XTC’s pop song The Man Who Murdered Love, it’s a suggestion to tear down the foundations in order to avoid the seemingly inevitable heartache that comes with an otherwise-loved time.

Tarah Pollock is charming as a woman waiting on an old flame to meet her… to grab that hope we all have or had that love will always turn out our way, until a realistic waitress (Courtney Scheuerman) helps her realize that she’s pinning too much of her happiness on chance. …or is she?

Spencer Weitzel sits at a bar waiting to meet someone – and the perfect person seems to have appeared. Now if only he can get out of his own head and talk to her. Of course, the perfect person has the same problem and both of them get quickly misunderstood or tongue tied while trying to get the same thing – each other.

To call an evening “charming” can come off as false praise, but it fits very well with Feeling Lucky. The performances are all good, the direction by Yuval Shrem is crisp and funny, and the writing by Fife gives us real stakes and heightened emotions and makes us care about characters in very short order – one walks out of the theater feeling that their own romantic problems (or successes!) are not only understood, but are Universal. And that’s not only heartening, but hopeful.

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