Tag Archives: obituary

RIC MONTEJANO, DIRECTOR, CHRONICLER, SILVER LAKE ICON, DIES AT 64

Gia On The Move got the news yesterday and it saddened us to hear it.  This is for my Angelenos, some of whom surely knew and/or worked with Ric. A highly active community centric man, Ric’s passing is surely a loss for the Silver Lake, theatrical and gay communities at large here in Los Angeles.
Rest in peace.  

What follows is a verbatim reprint of the press release.

RicMontejano-in-The-Indian-Wants-the-BronxCSUF

RicMontejano in The Indian Wants the BronxCSUF

 

Richard (Ric) Montejano was born on September 22, 1949 in San Gabriel and grew up in Van Nuys and then La Habra.  In the late 1970’s, he found his true community in Silver Lake where he lived as a creative artist, entrepreneur and activist on his own terms, chasing his passions and accepting the pitfalls, until he died from lung cancer on June 22, 2014 at the age of 64.

After graduating from La Habra High School, Ric attended CSU Fullerton where he developed his talents for choreography and directing as a student of theatre and dance.  In 1970 under Ric’s artistic direction, a troupe of fellow CSUF students formed the communal Dudesheep Theatre Company and moved to San Francisco.  They became the resident company at Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s City Lights Poets Theatre.  Ric directed the West Coast premiere of The Open Theatre’s The Serpent to rousing critical acclaim during the heyday of San Francisco’s experimental theatre boom.

Returning to Los Angeles in the mid-1970’s, Ric continued to perform sporadically as a dancer, actor, choreographer, playwright, producer and director at a variety of local venues including Scorpio Rising, Los Angeles Actors Theatre, The MET, The Fountain Theatre, and Word Space.

Over the years, Ric was a notable presence in Silver Lake.  He unabashedly loved the leafy, hilly neighborhoods that housed an interesting mix of locals who were gay, straight, Hispanic and a “little bit of everything.”  His first ink, in his fifties, was the words Silver Lake tattooed in bold calligraphy across the top of his back.

Ric Montejano spoken word is written down.

Ric Montejano spoken word is written down.

In the 1990’s he was proprietor of Mohawk’s Antiques & Collectables specializing in mid-century finds at his store near the corner of Mohawk and Sunset Blvd.  His knowledge, instinct and style attracted customers, and he loved “the hunt” of finding treasures at thrift stores, garage sales, estate sales and auctions.

Ric succumbed to the drug culture that was part of the unleashed gay lifestyle in the 1980’s and developed a weakness for speed that derailed his career and his health down to a period of sickness and homelessness.  His strong life force and creative energy prevailed, but he continued to fight this personal demon for the remainder of his life.

The AIDS epidemic that swept through the gay community had taken many of Ric’s close friends by the 1990’s and Ric was diagnosed with HIV and other ailments.  His direct link with historic times compelled Ric to write about his experiences as a gay man.  He discovered a knack for composition and cadence coupled with a distinctive and honest point of view.  He wrote with raw clarity about what he had observed and fantasized, including the Gay 80s, AIDS, crystal meth, incest, obsession and murder.

In SLHC Interview with Ric Montejano by Richard Goldin and Marco Larsen for the Silver Lake History Collective, Ric discusses his life and the evolution of the gay community in Silver Lake.  The interview can be seen here: 

In 2008 at the Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, Ric’s stories were performed under the title The Unforgiving Road, a journey down the mean streets through the eyes of a survivor.  Ric’s spoken word interpretation of his own stories went on to mesmerize and inform diverse audiences at many other venues and festivals in Los Angeles.

As his declining health kept him closer to home, Ric and his tiny tufted foundling Chihuahua-mix Sparky (the “velcro dog”) could be seen on their daily stroll down Silver Lake Blvd. to the 7-11 for a Big Gulp and the paper.  Every Saturday Ric became “the lamp man” and sold distinct, eclectic, collectable lamps from the curb in front of his Silver Lake apartment.  A steady stream of friends, neighbors, and passers-by populated his sales and enjoyed his generous, low key camaraderie.  They brought him food, reading matter, and even special finds for him to appraise or sell.

Ric detested threats to the character of his cozy, friendly Silver Lake neighborhood.  He became a community activist by spearheading the successful effort to ban digital billboards near his home on Silver Lake Blvd., close to the Silver Lake reservoir and the dog park.  Ric and Sparky stood daily across the street from the intrusive flashing electric sign that had been installed at Silver Lake and Effie, holding a hand-made poster that said “HONK if you hate the billboard.” His efforts and objections attracted major media attention that eventually unleashed a floodgate of protests to city hall until the sign was eventually removed.

ric on LOST bench

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Ric is one of the “Faces of Sunset Blvd.” in photographer Patrick Ecclesine’s book of the same name.  His “Lost” portrait of a shirtless Ric with a blond Mohawk haircut on a bus bench was featured in exhibits at LA City Hall, Arc Light Hollywood and at the Berlin City Hall-Germany.  Another candid portrait of Ric writing at his kitchen table by photographer Phil Chin was exhibited at the Pasadena Armory.

In 2011, Ric fulfilled a lifetime ambition to take a show he directed to New York City.  Performance artist John Fleck, a sometimes collaborator and longtime friend, asked that Ric help direct his auto-biographical one-man show, Mad Women.  Ric’s gifts for restraint, for visual and aural composition, and for focus on what’s essential, heightened the impact of Fleck’s stream of consciousness memory show that wove the story of an aging Judy Garland with that of John’s mother, Josephine Fleck who died of Alzheimer’s disease.

The show opened at the Skylight Theatre in Los Feliz to rave reviews and an extended run.  Then John and Ric travelled to La Mama NYC where a review from New York’s Stage and Cinema commended Ric for “weaving the show together with finesse and panache and a great deal of heart…never forgetting the darker truths or the human warmth.”  In L.A., John Fleck received an LA Drama Critics Circle Award for this production.

​Mad Women Director Ric Montejano – Photo by Ed Krieger

​Mad Women Director Ric Montejano – Photo by Ed Krieger

Ric is survived by his loving, strong, active family of friends.  He has been clear that he has no regrets over the life he chose.  In his own words, from his story “Beauty,” Ric says, “I don’t regret chasing the dragon or flying too close to the sun.  I don’t regret biting off more than I can chew or my nose to spite my face.  I don’t regret eating crow or humble pie.  I don’t regret walking down roads that led nowhere.  This journey is MINE.”

To send donations for several legacy projects, including publication of Ric’s Silver Lake stories, contact montejanomemorial@gmail.com .

Barbara Mandrell Speaks About Her Friend George Jones

Barbara Mandrell issued the following statement in response to the recent news of the passing of her dear friend, American Country Music singer George Jones, known for his long list of hit records, his distinctive voice and phrasing and his marriage to Tammy Wynette:
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bmandrell“I believe if you ask any singer who was the greatest country music singer of all time, they would say ‘George Jones’.
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He was without  question and by far the BEST! I first met and worked with him when I was 13 years old; I am so very grateful that he was my friend.” – Barbara Mandrell
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RIP George Jones. You Will Be Missed!

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Below is George appearing on  “The Ronnie Prophet Show”…

Number one country hits

  1. “White Lightning” (1959)
  2. “Tender Years” (1961)
  3. “She Thinks I Still Care” (1962)
  4. “Walk Through This World with Me” (1967)
  5. “We’re Gonna Hold On” (with Tammy Wynette) (1973)
  6. “The Grand Tour” (1974)
  7. “The Door” (1975)
  8. “Golden Ring” (with Tammy Wynette) (1976)
  9. “Near You” (with Tammy Wynette) (1977)
  10. “He Stopped Loving Her Today” (1980)
  11. “I Was Country When Country Wasn’t Cool” (with Barbara Mandrell) (1981)
  12. “Still Doin’ Time” (1981)
  13. “Yesterday’s Wine” (with Merle Haggard) (1982)
  14. “I Always Get Lucky with You” (1983)

One Of Our Own – Hall of Famer Merlin Olsen Dies

latimes.com

Merlin Olsen and a farewell to all that

March 12, 2010 |  9:29 am

The Rams have been gone from Los Angeles for twice as long as Merlin Olsen ever played for them.

Olsen died this week, and the Rams field teams in a different time zone, but he and his fellow Los Angeles Rams are still more identified with the team in the curled-horn helmets than just about anyone who’s played for the team since.

The Rams came to L.A. from Cleveland in 1946, the baby-boom year after VJ Day. In those early glory days, their blue and gold helmets showed black and white on that new medium of television.

As L.A. flourished in the 1960s, so did the Rams. I always loved their ornate names, like Restoration cavaliers': Norm Van Brocklin, Roman Gabriel, Merlin Olsen, all of them in the football Hall of Fame.

The team moved away from LA – but not far away – after the 1979 season. They went as far as Anaheim, which made former Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn declare memorably, ‘’Who’d go to see the Anaheim Rams?’’ Lots of people, as it turned out, but not enough to keep the team from skedaddling to St. Louis after 15 seasons in Disneytown.

Merlin Olsen was a rare sports star whose second career at least              equaled his first; his entertainment work, and then his charity work.

I’m sure there were some Gen X-ers who were surprised to find in his obituary that the man they knew as Jonathan from ”Little House on the Prairie” had played world-class football as one of the Rams’ ”Fearsome Foursome.”  

I don’t miss having a pro team in LA – no blackouts of any NFL games, after all. But I miss not having been here in time to know the spirit of those Rams, and that Ram in particular.

– Patt Morrison

Hall of Fame football player and actor Merlin Olsen, a giant man who friends say had an even larger heart, died Thursday after a long battle with cancer, he was 69.